Do stores lose money from extreme couponing?

Lisa, from Extreme Couponing Season 3, Episode 6 is a perfect example. What he does is remarkable: he saves huge amounts of money every week and feeds his family with very little.

Do stores lose money from extreme couponing?

Lisa, from Extreme Couponing Season 3, Episode 6 is a perfect example. What he does is remarkable: he saves huge amounts of money every week and feeds his family with very little. He also openly admits that his coupon philosophy has completely taken over his life and his time. With extreme coupons, people can spend hours and hours trying to find the best coupons and the best deals and leave the store with 10 gallons of laundry detergent at a fraction of the original price.

Why do you need so much detergent in the first place? Several examples were shown where profiled coupons received massive savings with their coupons, but in reality, the coupons they used did not match the products advertised on the coupon. In addition, in a particularly ill-timed shopping spree, the store doubled all the coupons the shopper redeemed. However, the normal store policy at the time for all other shoppers was that they only doubled the first three coupons per shopper. The manufacturer reimburses your local store for the value of the discount, plus a small fee per deal.

My nearby supermarket has strict policies on coupon codes, as people used expired coupons, coupon duplicates, or even tried to buy items that were similar to what was on the coupon. Extreme coupon buying usually goes hand in hand with storage, which is the purchase of a large quantity of a single item when you combine coupons with an in-store sale to make the item free or have a significantly reduced price. I often shopped at pharmacies like CVS, Rite-Aid, and Walgreens, which are the main retailers for extreme coupon buyers. In reality, many grocery stores have stopped doubling coupons or now have severe restrictions on how many coupons can be doubled.

Many staunch coupons will lift before dawn to be the first customers in stores, so they don't risk losing items advertised as on sale. While using one or two coupons to buy a product you would buy anyway can be a good way to save money, extreme coupons are often a hobby that pays little except for the annoyance and annoying appearance of other shoppers in stores. The store not only recovers the full value of the coupon, but will also receive a payment of 8 cents per redeemed coupon from the manufacturer of the product. For example, going with 144 coupons and buying six boxes of a product would not be allowed in most stores.

There are some great deals and there's no debate as to whether coupons can save you a little money, but let's take a close look at this activity. But if you're really extreme, you're probably rummaging through garbage cans looking for those little golden tickets (also known as coupons). When I was an extreme buyer of coupons, I frequented forums and participated in discussions about the use of coupons. You can combine a store coupon and a producer to get a bigger discount on the purchase of a single item in the same offer.

Coupons are a form of advertising that stores use to entice you to spend money on something you may or may not have needed. Extreme coupon buying usually involves combining in-store sales with manufacturer coupons to get free or very low-cost items.

Alexa Covar
Alexa Covar

Infuriatingly humble zombie lover. Certified music advocate. Total social media maven. Award-winning baconaholic. General travel fanatic. General music fan.

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